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Cell Phone Radiation on the Body, Fertility and Sperm Quality

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Although in most cases of infertility the focus is on the woman, men also play an important and equal role in the creation of life.  For this purpose, it is important for men to be aware of things that can alter their reproductive health.

This blog reviews a study that was published a few years ago about the impact of cell phone radiation on sperm quality.  The article looked at 32 healthy men with normal sperm health.  They were all instructed to avoid carrying their cell phone in their pants pockets for 2 months prior to testing.  Upon testing, they took a sample of their semen and divided half of the samples into group A and the other half into group B.  Both samples sat for 5 hours in the same environment, other than the fact that the samples in group B were in close proximity to a cell phone in talk mode.  The samples in group B has less sperm motility than group A.  DNA was also more fragmented in the cell phone group.  The conclusion showed that by the decrease in sperm motility and the increase in DNA fragmentation, cell phone radiation can in fact reduce male fertility.1

A couple of significant points of discernment. As you know, I always love to help you look at the evidence with a critical eye.  Here are some points to consider:

  1. Although there does likely seem to be other support for the fact that cell phone or other EMF exposure causes many problems2, looking at this study alone is worth noting that correlation doesn’t equal causation.  Perhaps this is not as likely, but it is possible that there were confounding factors that also played a role in the results.  Yet on the other hand there are other studies verifying ill effects…. And although we want to look at evidence as often as possible, sometimes there is a lack of large cohort studies for things like this because funding dollars for research get allocated to other areas such as cancer research (but that’s another issue…).
  2. Another noteworthy point in this study is that it was a relatively small sample size (only 32 men in the entire study).  This doesn’t make it wrong of course, but it would be helpful to see it repeated on a larger scale.  

Some other points to consider:

  • It is important when dealing with fertility issues to not only look into the health and habits of the woman but also the man.  This is a commonly overlooked issue for many couples.
  • Let’s get practical… If a sample of sperm can be reduced in quality in 5 hours, this has some pretty serious implications on what it could to do other parts/areas of the body with extended use.  

There are lots of devices that claim to reduce the effects. (I have tested many of them and most of them do not work.)  However, I have found a few that are excellent!  I use these myself and recommend them in my clinic.  For your personal computers/laptops/tablets, cell phones, kindles or home computers, the Q-Disc 5.0 or Cell Phone Shield are both excellent.  For cell phones, place them over the battery if possible.  To help support your entire house, I love the whole house Harmonizer as it’s easy to use.  It is. however, level specific (so if you have an upstairs and downstairs in your house, you may need more than one).  

Although the electromagnetic fields are not good for anyone, some people are indeed more sensitive than others.  If you feel that something is “off” no matter how much effort you put forth, you may need some extra help/support.  That is what we are here for.  Check out the website and reach out if you’d like help!  www.NewHopeHealth.com

 

Resource list:

1. Gorpinchenko I, Nikitin O, Banyra O, Shulyak A. The influence of direct mobile phone radiation on sperm quality. Cent Eur J Urol. 2014. doi:10.5173/ceju.2014.01.art14

2. Miller AB, Sears ME, Morgan LL, et al. Risks to health and well-being from radio-frequency radiation emitted by cell phones and other wireless devices. Front Public Heal. 2019. doi:10.3389/fpubh.2019.00223

 

Nothing said or implied in this post is intended to treat, cure, diagnose or prevent any disease.  It does not take the place of a health care practitioner.  It is for educational purposes only.